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Commercial Applications

Newsroom Set Design Goes Faux

Newsroom Set Design Goes Faux We find people discussing 'going faux' in all sorts of forums. Recently, the merits of faux panels were discussed in an article about newsroom set design. KETV7 newsroom set design with faux brick panels In the bottom left, you can see that KETV7 has gone for the 'faux brick' look. Our panels have always been popular for set dressing. Whether used for a limited-run stage performance, or a permanent set for a TV show, going 'faux' allows for the look of brick, wood or stone at a fraction of the cost of the real thing, and with just hours of installation or tear down time. In fact, we have a whole photo gallery dedicated to our products that have been used 'on set.' But we're not just tooting our own horn. In a recent blog post over at NewsCastStudio.com, writer Michael Hill discusses four trends in set design; and includes photos of KETV7 boasting faux brick panels at the base of their gigantic newscreen. Now, while we can't be sure those are our products or not (although they look a lot like our Carlton brick panels in Bordeaux) it demonstrates that the vivid texture of stone or brick is an important one; and going faux is an affordable and efficient way to get that look. Set design of Eyewitness News in New York, before and after photo Eyewitness News in New York used Norwich Kentucky Drystack panels in Desert Sand color on their set Today, more and more newsroom technology is greenscreen. Huge swathes of the set are covered in TV screens or blank green, so images and graphics can be superimposed over them. That makes real set design features more important than ever for giving the news crew a tangible space to move about in; and using brick or stone reinforces the solidity of those features. We ship products out across the United States; and the more we see them 'live on air' the more we'll share pictures and info with you. Until then, we return you to your regularly scheduled programming.