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Basements

Incredible Basement Bar Design with Beams

Incredible Basement Bar Design with Beams Dave DeSantis from Canfield, OH, sent in pictures of his stunning basement bar design from start to finish. We love getting photos from our customers - in particular those that document the project's progress, showing the full versatility of our products in the hands of creative homeowners. Stunning home basement bar design incorporating faux beams and stone veneer. The finished bar looks spectacular. Dave built his stunning basement bar from the ground up; and used Heritage beams in Burnt Mocha to finish it off with great effect. The bar's base consists of cement board, which Dave then covered with a stone veneer material. He didn't specify what type of stone he used, but it would have been the perfect application for our stacked stone panels from our sister site, FauxPanels.com. They're stunningly realistic, and would attach directly to the cement board. Dave began by building the bar out of cement board. Dave began by building the bar out of cement board. Dave then added the bar's top surface - and that's where our beams came in. The bar had two structural joists at either corner, and Dave wanted to conceal those. In addition, he wanted to add light fixtures to illuminate the bar surface. The Heritage beams were perfect to accomplish that. The bar's ceiling joists needed to be covered up. The ceiling joists needed to be covered up. To conceal the joists, Dave ordered the beams with four-sided lengths. These simply covered over the joists, and once sealed looked like solid lengths of real timber. It was impossible to tell that beneath them were steel joists, in addition to wires carrying a line direct to the mains. Heritage beams slotted easily over the steel supports connecting the bar to the ceiling Heritage beams slotted easily over the supporting posts. Above the bar, Dave used our 3-sided beams to create the appearance of timber fitting flush with the ceiling. Because they're made from lightweight polyurethane foam, Dave was able to cut them with a regular wood saw and assemble a structure that seamlessly met up with the vertical 4-sided beams and made it look as if the entire thing was one solid wood piece. The 3-sided, horizontal beams were also hollow inside - and Dave used that feature to run wiring for the next step in his project - light fixtures that appeared to be attached directly to the beams. Dave added lights on the top beams, and seamlessly hid the wires within them. Dave secured lights into the mounting blocks within the top beams, and seamlessly hid the wires within. Of course, that wasn't actually the case. The lights are attached to wooden mounting blocks within the beams. Dave was able to drill screws directly through the polyurethane and then into to the wood within, for a seamless yet secure look that held the light fixtures firmly, while sitting them flush with the beam surface. These look fantastic, and totally holistic to the concept of a solid timber bar. If Dave had been using real wood to make his bar, the wiring for these lights would have had to run on the outside of the wood - you can see similar arrangements in historical homes that have been updated with modern electrics. A finished basement bar built by the homeowner with the look of real wood and stone. The bar is stunning, and looks like it was made from natural materials In Dave's case, though, he could run the wires seamlessly inside the beam, for a look that is - believe it or not - actually 'better' than the real thing. As you can see from the pictures, the whole project came together beautifully. It's truly one of the most original and best-executed faux wood projects we've seen for a while, and we're excited to share it with you.

PRODUCT USED IN THIS PROJECT

Heritage Beams in Burnt Mocha

Heritage Beams in Burnt Mocha